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Author Topic: Tips for hosting a project?  (Read 1593 times)

Miyako

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Tips for hosting a project?
« on: December 25, 2012, 03:47:43 PM »
So, I want to start a new project.
I'm working on creating 3 hand drawn idols and they will need voices~ They will cover mainly H!P songs. As this takes a lot of time I don't want it to die.

Does anyone has good tips for hosting projects and keeping stuff alive?


Current H!P Top 3: Fukumura Mizuki, Iikubo Haruna, Michishige Sayumi
Favorite Groups: Morning Musume, S/mileage
Current favorite song: ??????????????????????Ver?

DC

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Re: Tips for hosting a project?
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2012, 05:20:53 PM »
I ran two project groups in my dubbing career, one that went horribly but I was able to run for two years before I knew I couldn't do anything else with and another that went beautifully because I took everything I learned from the old project and didn't do it.  The only reason it ended is because I am much too busy to mix like I used to be able to.  I will tell you three important things that I learned in my struggles.

One thing I learned from the project that went bad is to start small!  Don't be like "oh this is such a great idea I should do this and that" wait to see if you can get things out on time and then start picking up on releases or creative ideas.  I had from the beginning of my first project a dream of creating giant karaoke's with big full choruses (what I enjoy mixing most even now) but I let that dream hinder some of my choices I made early on and it just made things stressful.  Seeing as yours will start out as three people, I don't think you will have the  same problem I did.  But don't swamp them with too many songs right off the bat!

Don't cast people who aren't reliable!  If you have heard any little thing about this person that they missed a deadline, don't like turning in files until last minute, etc. don't cast them!  It's better to have some great singers who will record for you and sound great and be happy doing it then the best singers ever in karaoke who only give you lines when they feel like it.

Don't scout too many people.  If you want the project to grow in my experience the best projects I've had are the ones where I let people come to me, not me come to them.  Not only will they maybe not be interested, they might only say yes because they feel bad saying no.  Also, if they are not interested in the song they might not record.  Every single project I have done where I scouted the entire cast (or some of it) I have never not had to cover someone.  Sometimes the projects get delayed months because of this.  Let people come to you!

Sorry for the long paragraphs of information, I feel like I learned a lot from the first group I produced and I feel like I have a lot to share that could help you.  Good luck and have fun!  Your ideas sound great and I'm excited to hear the final products when you get around to doing this  :D

Edit - Also, one last thing, don't be afraid to be strict with your members.  Dubbing is about fun and hearing the final product in the end and loving it.  But with that comes hard work.  The strictest producers that I've seen have the longest running, best projects out there.  The laid back ones have so many unfinished projects and end up dying out really fast.  In the first group I did I was laid back (and most of the projects I joined back then were laid back, 95% of them are not here today), but in my last project and all of my mixes now I am strict and I have not had an unfinished collab in at least 3 years.
« Last Edit: December 25, 2012, 07:21:04 PM by DC »

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Miyako

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Re: Tips for hosting a project?
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2012, 06:14:06 PM »
Thank you so much for all the information!
I'm gonna use that for sure >w< ?

The hardest part for me will be being strict. I've had a Vocaloid Chorus which is kinda dead now because I keep on giving everyone extension and our current release has been delayed for 2 years now -shot-. But I'm gonna PM everyone to say we're going to stop because.... well... Everytime I tried to get people to work, they didn't respond and I lost my interest in Vocaloid.

I also had a little project that died because members were to busy..

But I'm gonna work hard for this one! I've been working on it for two months now. Thinking about everything and such :3


Current H!P Top 3: Fukumura Mizuki, Iikubo Haruna, Michishige Sayumi
Favorite Groups: Morning Musume, S/mileage
Current favorite song: ??????????????????????Ver?

Liana

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Re: Tips for hosting a project?
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2012, 01:03:53 AM »
Everything DC said is perfect. For me, I also had the most fun in groups where I was actual FRIENDS with the members. I could get SUPER sappy about this but dub groups are imaginary, friends are forever. JUST ASK ME. Some people want the distance but I just don't see how that's fun.

Also, I hate being strict too- dubbing is imaginary and it feels silly to act like a dictator, but seriously, it gets easier because dubbers are DICKS. If someone misses a deadline without any communication, REPLACE HER. Send her a PM that you replaced her because sometimes people sneak in lines if no one tells them they can't and you don't want double lines. If someone can easily see you've communicated you're replacing them and they STILL send in lines ANYWAY, that's douchey. Don't let them do that. They were being the douche, not you. In the Before Times it might be excusable but now everyone has a phone that can go on the internet AND make waffles so do not even let a lack of communication be an excuse, ever. SOMETIMES a girl will be like "Well I had cancer and I had to have cancer for two weeks" and you have to be like "Well, okay, cancer." Though honestly, it takes TWO SECONDS to communicate that you need an extension or can't get lines. If the girl can't do that, she doesn't give enough of a shit. In fact I just flaked out on someone like this. And I don't give a shit anymore. I had no business accepting her scouting me anyway. DC was right on that. I'm a douche. This is from the POV of a douche. If we can't communicate, we don't care.

IF you have a girl that is communicative but seems to need extension after extension, sit her down and tell her to set her own deadline and if she misses THAT deadline, she's out. This works like a charm. Because the girl is able to set her own deadline custom around her schedule and her life, she generally will get her lines in. And because you LET her set her own deadline if she STILL can't get her shit together and you BOTH know you went out on a limb for her, you can give her a very polite "Well, the time has come!" e-mail guilt free and she'll take it very well. Sometimes people WILL try to guilt trip you with the mythical Cold. My own brother is allergy infested and sick all the time yet he's not sick NEARLY as much as some dubbers claim to be. I've noticed a very DIRECT corrolation between Douchiness and the amount of colds a girl claims to have. Do not be fooled by hypochondria. In dubbing, it's another word for procrastination. I've recorded when I was sick as fuck and could barely hit notes and it turns out I'm still alive and kicking so do not even listen to these people.
« Last Edit: December 26, 2012, 01:05:54 AM by Liana »

BakaPai

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Re: Tips for hosting a project?
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2012, 01:11:27 AM »
To tell you the truth, I've had the same problem. As soon as everything starts in a group, for some reason members start to go inactive already, or even - in my paranoia - avoid the subject, which is silly... You auditioned for it, why aren't you prepared to take it on?

Starting small is always the best way as well as choosing members who would be committed (perhaps even dubbers who you know personally or maybe even ask about people, kind of like a reference for babysitting), at least in the beginning, otherwise you'd be stuck thinking of ways to tackle it. I'd say getting strangers from Youtube to audition doesn't usually go well. I've done it at least twice and most were very flaky and tended to avoid handing in lines.

Being strict is also another key. I send messages quite a lot for reminders or even to just ask what is happening - keep note of when you had sent the message and IF they reply. I've started to keep track so I know who appears not to be up for it despite being active between then.

It can be a pain considering all the time and effort you've put in, but these days it's hard when a lot of us have other things on our mind. But just a small reply, even just "yes I am aware, I'm sorry, I can give you an estimate of when you will receive... " can go along way, at least for me.

Also, reputation is also very important.
always thirsty for subscribers ngl.
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Miyako

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Re: Tips for hosting a project?
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2012, 08:30:13 AM »
Whaaa. Thanks so much for all the tips!


@Liana, that friends thing is so true! I'm in a certain project and we're like all family of each other. Everyone is so kind and supportive. Even when our leader dissappeared, we kept going on with the stuff.

@BakaPai. That asking people thing wouldn't work for me I guess. It went wrong the last time. And I would love it to work with girls that are still a little new in the dubber world I think... :3


Current H!P Top 3: Fukumura Mizuki, Iikubo Haruna, Michishige Sayumi
Favorite Groups: Morning Musume, S/mileage
Current favorite song: ??????????????????????Ver?

 




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